Different Varieties of Potatoes: Understanding the Differences Between Late Mid and Early Season Potatoes

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Different Varieties of Potatoes: Understanding the Differences Between Late Mid and Early Season Potatoes

When it comes to potatoes, there are different types that can be classified based on their growing season. The three main categories are early-season, mid-season, and late-season potatoes. The type of potato planted will determine the time it takes for the potato plant to mature and produce edible potatoes.

Early-season potatoes are planted in the spring and typically take between 70 to 90 days to mature. They are able to grow and produce potatoes in cooler soil temperatures, making them a great choice for regions with shorter growing seasons. These varieties are usually small to medium in size and are perfect for making potato salad.

Mid-season potatoes are planted in the spring, but they take a bit longer to mature than early-season varieties. They usually take between 90 to 110 days to produce harvestable potatoes. Mid-season potatoes are very versatile and can be used for a variety of cooking methods. They usually have a higher starch content and tend to be larger in size.

Late-season potatoes are planted a bit later in the growing season, after the threat of frost has passed. They take longer to mature, with a growing period of 110 to 135 days. Late-season potatoes are known for their excellent storage ability and can be kept for several months after harvest. They are typically large in size, have an eye-catching appearance, and are great for baking.

Early Season Varieties

Early season potatoes are varieties that can be planted and harvested earlier in the growing season compared to mid-season and late-season potatoes. These early-maturing potatoes are able to grow and produce in cooler soil and resist frost much better than other types.

One example of an early season potato variety is the White Rose. It is an heirloom variety that can be planted as soon as the soil can be worked in the spring. It produces small to medium-sized potatoes, perfect for salads or boiling. The White Rose potatoes have a smooth white skin and shallow eyes. They have a wonderful flavor and can be enjoyed shortly after the first harvest.

Another early season variety is the Yukon Gold. It is a popular type of potato that is known for its high yield and good storage qualities. Yukon Gold potatoes have a yellow flesh and a thin, light brown skin. They are very versatile and can be used for various dishes, including baking, boiling, and frying. This variety typically takes about 70-90 days to mature.

The Red Norland is also an early season potato variety. It has a red skin and creamy white flesh. Red Norland potatoes have a buttery flavor and are great for roasting, boiling, and mashing. They are resistant to scab and wilt, making them a reliable choice for early season planting.

When growing early season potatoes, it is important to take into account the temperature and soil conditions. These varieties can tolerate cooler temperatures, but they will not thrive in wet or waterlogged soil. It is best to plant them in well-draining soil that has been amended with organic matter to promote healthy growth.

Early season potatoes are a great choice for gardeners who want to enjoy fresh potatoes earlier in the growing season. They can be planted and harvested before the mid-season and late-season varieties are ready. With proper care and maintenance, early season potatoes are able to produce a bountiful harvest that can keep you well-fed throughout the summer.

Keep an Eye on the Size

When growing potatoes, it’s important to keep an eye on the size of the tubers. Different types of potatoes, such as early-maturing, mid-season, and late-season varieties, have varying sizes at harvest.

Early-maturing potatoes are the first to be harvested, usually around 70 to 90 days after planting. These potatoes are smaller in size, making them ideal for salads or as a side dish. They have a thin skin and a creamy texture when cooked.

Mid-season potatoes are harvested between early-maturing and late-season ones. They take around 90 to 120 days to mature. These potatoes are larger in size compared to early-maturing ones but smaller than late-season varieties. They are versatile and can be used in various dishes, such as mashed potatoes or roasted potatoes.

Late-season potatoes take the longest time to mature, usually around 110 to 135 days after planting. These potatoes have a larger size and a higher yield compared to early and mid-season ones. They are great for baking, frying, or making mashed potatoes. Late-season potatoes have a thick skin and a fluffy texture when cooked.

When selecting seed potatoes for planting, it’s important to consider the size of the tubers. Smaller seed potatoes are typically used for early-maturing varieties, while larger ones are best for late-season potatoes. By using the right size of seed potatoes, you’ll be able to produce a good yield of the specific potato type you want to grow.

In Wetaskiwin, Canada, the average first frost date is around September 17th. This means that late-season potatoes should be harvested before this date to prevent them from being damaged by frost. However, late-season potatoes can be left in the ground for longer if needed. It’s important to keep an eye on the weather conditions and harvest the potatoes before the soil becomes too wet or temperatures drop below freezing.

In summary, the size of potatoes varies depending on the type and season. Early-maturing potatoes are smaller, mid-season ones are in-between, and late-season potatoes are larger. Make sure to select the right size of seed potatoes based on the type of potato you want to grow. Keep an eye on the weather conditions and harvest the potatoes before frost or unfavorable conditions occur.

Types Of Potatoes – What Are Late Mid And Early Season Potatoes

When it comes to potatoes, there are three main types based on their growing season: early season, mid-season, and late-season potatoes.

Early season potatoes are the first to be planted and harvested. They have a smaller size and are able to grow in cooler soil. These potatoes are often used for salads and can be harvested and used as soon as they reach a desirable size. Some popular early-season varieties include Yukon Gold and Red Pontiac.

Mid-season potatoes are planted between early and late-season potatoes. They take longer to mature and are harvested after the early-season potatoes. These potatoes have a medium size and are able to withstand some frost. They are versatile and can be used for a variety of purposes, including frying, baking, and boiling. Popular mid-season varieties include Kennebec and Yellow Finn.

Late-season potatoes are left in the ground longer than the other two types. They take the longest time to mature and are harvested after the mid-season potatoes. These potatoes have a larger size and are able to grow in wetter soil. They are great for storage and can be stored for a longer period of time. Popular late-season varieties include Russet and Purple Majesty.

Each type of potato has its own unique characteristics and uses. Whether you prefer the early-maturing potatoes for their smaller size and ability to grow in cooler soil, the mid-season potatoes for their versatility, or the late-season potatoes for their larger size and longer storage ability, there is a variety of potatoes for every preference and purpose.

Types of Potatoes

There are various types of potatoes available, each with its own unique characteristics and uses. These different types can be categorized based on their planting and harvesting seasons: early, mid-season, and late-season potatoes.

Early-season potatoes are typically ready for harvest within 80-100 days of planting. They are able to grow and produce food quickly, making them a popular choice for gardeners and farmers. Early-season potatoes are smaller in size and have a waxy texture, making them ideal for boiling or using in salads.

Mid-season potatoes take between 100-120 days to mature and are harvested in the middle of the growing season. They are larger in size and have a higher starch content compared to early-season potatoes. Mid-season potatoes can be used in a variety of dishes, from mashed potatoes to french fries.

Late-season potatoes take longer to grow and are typically harvested towards the end of the growing season, after about 120-140 days. These potatoes have a higher starch content and are often used for baking or frying. Late-season potatoes also have a longer shelf life due to their higher sugar content, so they can be stored for longer periods of time.

When choosing a variety of potatoes to grow, it is important to take into account the specific characteristics and uses of each type. Some popular varieties include Yukon Gold, Russet, Red Bliss, and Fingerling. Each variety has its own unique flavor, texture, and cooking properties.

In addition to the three main types of potatoes, there are also heirloom varieties available. These are older, traditional potato varieties that have been passed down through generations. Heirloom potatoes often have unique colors, shapes, and flavors, making them a wonderful addition to any garden or kitchen.

Regardless of the type of potatoes you choose to grow, it is important to plant them in well-drained soil and keep them watered throughout the growing season. Potatoes are hardy plants, but they can be susceptible to frost damage and wet conditions. With proper care and attention, you can enjoy a bountiful harvest of delicious potatoes!

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Dr Heidi Parkes

By Dr Heidi Parkes

Senior Information Extension Officer QLD Dept of Agriculture & Fisheries.